In 1561 Agnes Leaman was ducked in the river Wensum in Norwich. She was one of many men and women who were punished for 'ill rule' and 'evil behaviour'. Theirs were the petty crimes of drunkenness,  theft and other misbehaviour. They were real people whose deeds are revealed from court records and the folk stories of long ago! This performance is a fusion of factual stories taken from all ‘classes’ of society with fictional stories about beggars, thieves & pedlars; Merchants, Lords & Kings.
The Shaming of Agnes Leman
Some time between 1320 & 1340 Geoffrey Luttrell commissioned a Psalter. A collection of illuminated Psalms that has become famous for the incredible detail and scope of images held within its pages. There are of course many biblical scenes as you might expect in a religious work such as this, but also many comic and not so comic scenes from contemporary rustic life. From the wife beating her husband with her distaff, to wrestlers wrestling and bear baiters baiting bears. From a ploughmen ploughing to dancers dancing and drunkards fighting. From a hen-wife feeding her hens to mock bishops and any amount of demons and other grotesques.  They are in the Psalter because all are stock figures in medieval culture and all appear in many a medieval tale. And many of them get a chance to tell their stories in this performance.
Luttrell Voices
A lone traveler wanders the road from town to town, village to village and house to house wearing many different disguises. Sometimes, a priest, sometimes a potter, sometimes a pedlar of wares. From pots to pardons, potions to pins, he sells them all occasionally, but always he peddles lies. His trade is deceit and he practices his craft upon the foolish, greedy and gullible. Although whether or not they deserve his artful attentions will be up to you to decide.
Beguiling for Beginners.
Or
A Celebration of cunning men, coney catching and all manner of counterfeit craftiness 
Dame Fortune’s Wheel & The Three Estates
Dame Fortune's Wheel & The Three Estates is an exploration of the three 'classes' of men and women from long ago. Those who worked, those who prayed and those who fought. The performance vividly illustrates the ups and downs of people’s lives as they rode upon Fortune’s Wheel. The stories also celebrate the use of the mystical number three, a motif commonly found in many traditional tales. The performance promises a compelling mix of humorous and revealing tales, interwoven with crafty and relevant riddles. Tale telling that brings the long past into the here and now.